Document Type

Article

Publication Date

4-2018

Publication Title

Journal of Exercise Science & Fitness

Volume

16

Abstract

Background/objective

The relationship between ventilatory threshold (VT1, VT2) and repeated-sprint ability (RSA) in competitive male ice hockey players was investigated.

Methods

Forty-three male ice hockey players aged 18–23 years competing in NCAA Division I, NCAA Division III, and Junior A level participated. Participants performed an incremental graded exercise test on a skate treadmill to determine V˙" role="presentation" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; display: inline-block; line-height: normal; font-size: 14.4px; word-spacing: normal; overflow-wrap: normal; white-space: nowrap; float: none; direction: ltr; max-width: none; max-height: none; min-width: 0px; min-height: 0px; border: 0px; position: relative;">V˙O2peak, VT1, and VT2 using MedGraphics Breezesuit™ software (v-slope). Participants performed an on-ice repeated shift (RSA) test consisting of 8-maximal skating bouts, lasting approximately 25 s and interspersed with 90 s of passive recovery, to determine first gate, second gate, and total sprint decrement (%dec). Pearson product-moment correlations and multiple regressions were used to assess relationships between ventilatory threshold variables (VT1, VT2, Stage at VT1, and Stage at VT2) and RSA (first gate, second gate, and total course decrement).

Results

Stage at VT2 was the only variable substantially correlated with first gate (r = −0.35; P < 0.05), second gate (r = −0.58; P < 0.001) and total course decrement (r = −0.42; P < 0.05).

Conclusion

The results of this study demonstrated that VT is substantially associated with RSA, and VT2 is more strongly correlated with RSA than V˙" role="presentation" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; display: inline-block; line-height: normal; font-size: 14.4px; word-spacing: normal; overflow-wrap: normal; white-space: nowrap; float: none; direction: ltr; max-width: none; max-height: none; min-width: 0px; min-height: 0px; border: 0px; position: relative;">V˙O2peak. This study suggests that longer duration high-intensity interval training at intensities that increase workrate at VT2 may lead to possible improvements in RSA.

Issue

1

First Page

32

Last Page

36

DOI

10.1016/j.jesf.2018.03.003

ISSN

1728-869X

Rights

First published in the Journal of Exercise Science & Fitness.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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