Document Type

Article

Publication Date

9-2015

Publication Title

Journal of Banking & Finance

Volume

58

Abstract

A large number of newly listed firms have significant involvement in international business activity. In this paper, we examine the effect of international business activity on the pricing of initial public offerings (IPOs), post-IPO performance, and survival. In a large sample of U.S. IPOs over 1981–2012, we find that firms with exports and/or foreign sales prior to going public have significantly lower underpricing than firms without international business activity. Furthermore, firms with international business activity significantly outperform purely domestic IPO firms over 3- and 5-year periods after going public and have a significantly higher survival rate. Overall, we provide strong evidence that global diversification has an economically significant effect on the valuation and subsequent performance of firms going public.

First Page

436

Last Page

456

DOI

10.1016/j.jbankfin.2015.05.015

ISSN

0378-4266

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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