Event Title

Panel: Once Upon a Time

Presenter Information

Harry Crews
James Dickey
Selo Black Crow

Location

UND Memorial Ballroom

Start Date

21-3-1980 12:00 PM

End Date

21-3-1980 1:00 PM

Description

This audiovisual recording from March 21, 1980 as part of the 11th annual UND Writing Conference: “The Storytellers” features Harry Crews, Selo Black Crow, and James Dickey forming the panel “Once Upon a Time.” The panelists share stories through oral tradition. Black Crow, a Lakota spiritual leader and activist, tells the story behind sweat lodge ceremony, discusses how stories about sacred ceremonies are handed down between generations, jokes about how native people come to know and conflate the myths and stories of white people, and talks about his experience in Korea during the war and defending the Sundance. James Dickey tells a story about Flannery O'Conner's research habits, discusses the storytelling methods of writers and comedians, and the transition of Southern intellectualism from art to the law. Harry Crews talks about the influence of full-color Sears Roebuck catalogs on his young imagination and shares an anecdote about visiting a moonshiner. John Little discusses Southern storytelling and North Dakota storytelling. The panelists also respond to audience questions about what is lost in the writing of an otherwise oral story, the effect of television on storytelling, the homogenization of dialect, and regionalism and cultural pluralism.

Moderator: John Little.

Comments

Permissions pending, digitization planned.

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Mar 21st, 12:00 PM Mar 21st, 1:00 PM

Panel: Once Upon a Time

UND Memorial Ballroom

This audiovisual recording from March 21, 1980 as part of the 11th annual UND Writing Conference: “The Storytellers” features Harry Crews, Selo Black Crow, and James Dickey forming the panel “Once Upon a Time.” The panelists share stories through oral tradition. Black Crow, a Lakota spiritual leader and activist, tells the story behind sweat lodge ceremony, discusses how stories about sacred ceremonies are handed down between generations, jokes about how native people come to know and conflate the myths and stories of white people, and talks about his experience in Korea during the war and defending the Sundance. James Dickey tells a story about Flannery O'Conner's research habits, discusses the storytelling methods of writers and comedians, and the transition of Southern intellectualism from art to the law. Harry Crews talks about the influence of full-color Sears Roebuck catalogs on his young imagination and shares an anecdote about visiting a moonshiner. John Little discusses Southern storytelling and North Dakota storytelling. The panelists also respond to audience questions about what is lost in the writing of an otherwise oral story, the effect of television on storytelling, the homogenization of dialect, and regionalism and cultural pluralism.

Moderator: John Little.