Date of Award

January 2020

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Counseling Psychology & Community Services

First Advisor

Kara Wettersten

Abstract

Abstract Attachment style is theorized to develop in childhood, as a result of the bonds that develop between child and caregiver. The research has shown individuals with an insecure attachment style are more at risk for job burnout and less satisfied with their jobs. This study proposed, mindfulness may be the internal process influencing the relationship between attachment style, burnout and job satisfaction. Mindfulness is defined as paying attention on purpose, in the present moment, nonjudgmentally and has found to be positively correlated with secure attachment styles. Additionally, mindfulness has shown to have a negative relationship with burnout and a positive relationship with job satisfaction, similar to secure attachment. Therefore, mindfulness is being proposed as a mechanism that serves to mediate the relationship between attachment style, burnout and job satisfaction. A total of 87 practicing mental health clinicians completed measures of attachment style, trait mindfulness, burnout and job satisfaction. The results revealed mindfulness partially mediates the relationship between anxious attachment style and depersonalization, a facet of burnout. Results also showed mindfulness partially mediated the relationship between anxious attachment style and emotional exhaustion, another facet of burnout. Mindfulness was not shown to mediate the relationship between insecure attachment and job satisfaction, nor between insecure attachment and personal accomplishment, the final facet of burnout that was measured. These findings suggest mindfulness may be a critical resource in helping mental health clinicians combat the negative aspects of burnout, specifically emotional exhaustion and depersonalization.

Share

COinS