Title

A Comparison of Cognitive Moral Reasoning Among Selected NCAA Division II Intercollegiate Coaches and Athletes

Date of Award

5-1-1997

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Educational Leadership

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to analyze the cognitive moral reasoning of NCAv5 Division II coaches and athletes. The Hahm-Beller Values Choice Inventory (HBVCI) (Hahm, Beller, & Stoll, 1989) was used to assess the perceived responses of collegiate coaches and athletes in moral situations using sport scenarios. Specific comparisons included athletes and coaches, female and male athletes, coaches of female and male sports, individual and team sports among athletes, and individual and team sports among coaches. Secondary research was conducted to compare differences among women’s basketball, women's track, men’s basketball, and men's wrestling.

Twenty-eight sport teams consisting of 56 coaches and 366 student athletes completed the HBVCI. The results indicated that there were no significant differences in cognitive moral reasoning between athletes and coaches. The athletes' scores often closely resembled the scores of their respective coaches. There were no significant differences between coaches of female and male sports, individual and team sports for athletes, and individual and team sports for coaches. However, there was a significant difference between female and male athletes with female athletes demonstrating a higher level of cognitive moral reasoning on justice and honesty items. Additionally, there was a significant difference in the total justice, honesty, and responsibility items. Ancillary to the research questions, additional analysis demonstrated that female track athletes scored significantly higher in cognitive moral reasoning than athletes in men's basketball and men's wrestling.

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