Title

A Study to Determine the Effects of a Perceptual-Motor Program Upon the Improvement of Motor Skills and the Enhancement of Self-Concepts of Primary School Children, Grades One Through Three

Date of Award

5-1-1975

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Department

Teaching & Learning

Abstract

The purpose of this study wa3 to determine whether a perceptual-motor program, conducted by primary classroom teachers, could improve not only children*3 motor skills, but also enhance their self-concept.

Two hundred and thirty-four children in grades one, two, and three, from the Great Palls Public School District, were divided into two groups, experimental (N=121) and control (N=113). The experimental group received eight weeks of treatment (a perceptual-motor program) on a daily basis from their classroom teacher who themselves had received twelve to sixteen hours of in-service instruction in perceptual-motor training. The control group continued to receive physical education instruction from their teachers three days each week and from a specialist two days each week.

Pre- and post-testing of both groups consisted of administering individually fifteen sub-tests (tests 1 through 4> 5 through 10, 12, 13, 16, 19» 22 and 28) of the Lincoln- Oserotsky Motor Development Scale (LOMDS) (Sloan, 1954) and the Politte Self-Concept Adjective Check List (SCAC).

Appropriate statistical analysis of the results of the pre- and post-tests revealed no significant differences between the experimental group and the control group in either motor skill improvement or enhancement of 3elf-concopt.

The pre- and post-results of the SCAC did not discriminate. All but two of the subjoct3, from pre- to po3t-, had, as defined by Politte, a healthy self-concept in that their self-concept index scores were between 1.5 and 2.5.

The LOMDS is a test of motor development. It did not, and probably will not, be suitable for providing significant gains in motor scores over a short duration of time. Since neuromuscular development is the primary antecedent of the development of motor skills, no amount of practice or special programs will enhance motor skills until the child advances physiologically and anatomically from one stage to another. The duration of this study (eight tv’eelts) did not appear to be long enough to allow for the neuromuscular development which was a prerequisite for the improvement of motor skills.

The conclusions of this study were: 1. The light week perceptual-motor program did not improve motor skills or enhance self- concept . 2. Though reliable, the LOMDS does not appear to be sensitive enough to allow for gains in motor skills over a short duration of time (8 weeks). 3. The SCAC is not a reliable instrument for primary school children as it did not discriminate from a pre- to post-inventory with an interval of eight weeks.The conclusions of this study were: 1. The light week perceptual-motor program did not improve motor skills or enhance self- concept . 2. Though reliable, the LOMDS does not appear to be sensitive enough to allow for gains in motor skills over a short duration of time (8 weeks). 3. The SCAC is not a reliable instrument for primary school children as it did not discriminate from a pre- to post-inventory with an interval of eight weeks. i+. It appears that an in-service program of twelve to sixteen hours is time for teachers to become efficient in organizing and conducting a perceptual-motor program. 5. There is 'an urgent need for a reliable self- concept instrument and a motor skills growth test for primary school children.

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