Date of Award

January 2015

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Kinesiology & Public Health Education

First Advisor

John Fitzgerald

Abstract

ABSTRACT

The Effects of Caffeine Supplementation on Vertical Jump Performance. Introduction: Caffeine enhances performance of many types of exercise, but its effects on vertical jump are unclear. Purpose: To investigate the effects of caffeine on vertical jump tests on a force platform. Methods: The study was a single-blind, randomized, crossover design. Participants consumed either caffeine (5 mg/kg body weight) or placebo. After a sixty-minute waiting period participants performed three squat jumps and three countermovement jumps separated by 30 seconds each while standing on a force platform. There were two minutes of rest between the two different types of jumps. Results: In comparison to placebo, caffeine increased squat jump height (34.5 ± 6.7 vs. 32.7 ± 6.2 cm; p < .05) and countermovement jump height (37.9 ± 7.4 vs. 36.4 ± 6.9 cm; p < .05). Squat jump time to half peak force was decreased with caffeine supplementation (0.074 ± 0.038 vs. 0.084 ± 0.041 s, p < .05). Caffeine increased average rate of force development (7,229 ± 4,049 vs. 6,371 ± 3,435 N.s-1 ; p < .05), peak force (12,453 ± 6,716 vs. 10,979 ± 5,029 N; p < .05), S-Gradient (9,487 ± 6,342 vs. 7,995 ± 4,337 N; p < .05), and A-Gradient (6,558 ± 3,253 vs. 5,813 ± 3,147 N; p < .05) in countermovement jump. Discussion: Caffeine supplementation (5 mg/kg) improved vertical jump performance in NCAA Division I athletes.

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