Date of Award

1998

Document Type

Scholarly Project

Degree Name

Master of Physical Therapy (MPT)

Department

Physical Therapy

First Advisor

Thomas Mohr

Keywords

Electromyography; Muscles -- physiology; Running

Abstract

Background and Purpose: The purpose of this study is twofold 1) to describe muscle activity and joint motion while running on a treadmill at different speeds and inclines and 2) to examine whether or not running on a treadmill at high speeds and on an inline causes particular muscles to work harder or the sprinter to change their running technique to accommodate the increased workload.

Subjects and Methods: EMG and motion analysis data was collected from six subjects while they were running on a treadmill, first at twenty miles per hour at zero percent grade and then at thirteen miles per hour and thirty percent grade.

Results: This study shows that there is a greater amount of EMG activity during sprinting at twenty miles per hour at zero percent grade than there is on the incline at thirteen miles per hour and thirty percent grade. The gastrocnemius, anterior tibialis, and rectus femoris had the greatest increases in activity between the two trials. The range of motion for both trials was similar with the exception of hip flexion. On the incline, the subjects showed greater amounts of hip flexion.

Conclusion and Discussion: Incline training appears to be useful in helping athletes increase their overall hip range of motion to assist in increasing their overall velocity. Training at either level increased EMG activity, but apparently, velocity has a greater influence on the amplitude of EMG activity then running on the incline.

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