Date of Award

2020

Document Type

Scholarly Project

Degree Name

Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT)

Department

Occupational Therapy

First Advisor

Sarah Nielsen

Abstract

Introduction: The purpose of this project was to develop a guide for occupational therapy practitioners to use in the school setting for elementary-age children with mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI), to increase services for these children, and to improve their back to school transition process.

Methodology: A literature review was conducted to understand the needs and barriers of elementary-age children who transition back to the school setting after experiencing a mTBI. Sources used in the process include online databases, textbooks, and government websites. The Person, Occupation, and Environment (PEO) model by Law and colleagues (1996) was selected to direct the development of the guide. The PEO model provides a unique transactive dynamic relationship that occurs when people engage in a given occupation over a period of time, which are important for these students (Law et al., 1996).

Results: Through the literature review the need for: (a) children to receive services, (b) education for professional involved, and (c) interventions for elementary-age children with mTBIs were emphasized children with a mTBI often to do not receive services when transitioning back to school (Gioia, Glang, Hooper, & Brown, 2016; McAvoy & Haarbauer-Krupa, 2019; Rivara et al., 2012). They are additionally faced with the barriers of inconsistent approaches with the transition process, limited information regarding their injury is shared with the school, their teachers have limited knowledge on mTBIs, and they receive a lack of support with their educational demands (Gioia, Glang, Hooper, & Brown, 2016; McAvoy & Haarbauer-Krupa, 2019; Rivara et al., 2012). Supporting Educational Performance for Elementary Children with Mild Traumatic Brain Injuy: A Guide for Occupational Therapy Practitioners was developed to address the specific needs of elementary-age children with mTBIs in the academic setting. The guide provides direct intervention recommendations, consultation recommendations for teachers, and additional resources to use with the targeted population.

Conclusions: Following a student’s transition back to school after a mTBI, it is important for these children to receive services to assist with the demands of education. By implementing the guide Supporting Educational Performance for Elementary Children with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A Guide for Occupational Therapy Practitioners, elementary-age children with mTBIs will be able to engage in the occupation of education with the level of support they require.

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