Event Title

Effects of Training Period on Disordered Eating in Triathletes

Location

Memorial Union Lecture Bowl

Start Date

26-10-2018 1:45 PM

End Date

26-10-2018 2:00 PM

Description

For athletes, there has been little research done on the prevalence of eating disorders or disordered eating. However, from what has been studied, outcomes suggest that athletes may be at a higher risk for the development of an eating disorder than non-athletes. The present research study will examine whether there is a relationship between training period (off-season, before a big race, after a big race) and disordered eating patterns among triathletes. The current study takes approximately thirteen triathletes, both male and female, elite and non-elite, and looks at their eating behaviors and attitudes at those three time points using the EDE-Q. This study found that the time point before a big race is associated with significantly greater rates of disordered eating when compared to the time point directly after the race. There was no significant difference between sexes or those of different elite statuses in overall disordered eating.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 26th, 1:45 PM Oct 26th, 2:00 PM

Effects of Training Period on Disordered Eating in Triathletes

Memorial Union Lecture Bowl

For athletes, there has been little research done on the prevalence of eating disorders or disordered eating. However, from what has been studied, outcomes suggest that athletes may be at a higher risk for the development of an eating disorder than non-athletes. The present research study will examine whether there is a relationship between training period (off-season, before a big race, after a big race) and disordered eating patterns among triathletes. The current study takes approximately thirteen triathletes, both male and female, elite and non-elite, and looks at their eating behaviors and attitudes at those three time points using the EDE-Q. This study found that the time point before a big race is associated with significantly greater rates of disordered eating when compared to the time point directly after the race. There was no significant difference between sexes or those of different elite statuses in overall disordered eating.