Event Title

Differentiating Active and Passive Fatigue with the Use Electroencephalography

Location

Memorial Union Lecture Bowl

Start Date

26-10-2018 9:00 AM

End Date

26-10-2018 9:15 AM

Description

Active fatigue results when operators must make constant perceptual-motor adjustments during high task demands. In contrast, passive fatigue results from operators executing little or no perceptual-motor adjustments during low task demands, similar to when automation is employed. The purpose of this study was to use electroencephalographic (EEG) indices of workload, engagement, and a candidate marker of strain under fatigue in conjunction with performance and subjective measures to differentiate active and passive fatigue states. Participants (N=84) performed a generalized flight simulator for 62 min either under active, passive, or control conditions. Passive fatigue was characterized by reduced EEG engagement and initially elevated and stable ratios of Fz theta to POz alpha power compared to active fatigue. Passive fatigue was characterized by reduced ratings of alertness and workload compared to active fatigue. A speed-accuracy performance trade-off was observed from pre to post fatigue induction. Results have implications for developing fatigue countermeasure technologies.

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Oct 26th, 9:00 AM Oct 26th, 9:15 AM

Differentiating Active and Passive Fatigue with the Use Electroencephalography

Memorial Union Lecture Bowl

Active fatigue results when operators must make constant perceptual-motor adjustments during high task demands. In contrast, passive fatigue results from operators executing little or no perceptual-motor adjustments during low task demands, similar to when automation is employed. The purpose of this study was to use electroencephalographic (EEG) indices of workload, engagement, and a candidate marker of strain under fatigue in conjunction with performance and subjective measures to differentiate active and passive fatigue states. Participants (N=84) performed a generalized flight simulator for 62 min either under active, passive, or control conditions. Passive fatigue was characterized by reduced EEG engagement and initially elevated and stable ratios of Fz theta to POz alpha power compared to active fatigue. Passive fatigue was characterized by reduced ratings of alertness and workload compared to active fatigue. A speed-accuracy performance trade-off was observed from pre to post fatigue induction. Results have implications for developing fatigue countermeasure technologies.